Chepstow Castle - Chepstow, River Wye - Monmouthshire, UK

Chepstow Castle - Wales, River Wye - Monmouthshire, UK

Chepstow Castle (Welsh: Cas-gwent), located in Chepstow, Monmouthshire in Wales, on top of cliffs overlooking the River Wye, is the oldest surviving post-Roman stone fortification in Britain.
CHEPSTOW CASTLE - CHEPSTOW, RIVER WYE - MONMOUTHSHIRE, UK

Chepstow Castle, Wales


Its construction was begun under the instruction of the Norman Lord William fitz Osbern, soon made Earl of Hereford, from 1067, and it was the southernmost of a chain of castles built along the English-Welsh border in the Welsh Marches. The castle ruins are Grade I listed as at 6 December 1950.

Chepstow Castle

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Building of the castle
Chepstow Castle is situated on a narrow ridge between the limestone river cliff and a valley, known locally as the Dell, on its landward side. Its full extent is best appreciated from the opposite bank of the River Wye. The castle has fourbaileys, added in turn through its history.

Chepstow city

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Foundation, 1067-1188
The speed with which William the Conqueror committed to the creation of acastle at Chepstow is testament to its strategic importance. There is no evidence for a settlement there of any size before the Norman invasion of Wales, although it is possible that the castle site itself may have previously been a prehistoric or early medieval stronghold.

Chepstow Castle, Wales


The castle today
Chepstow Castle is open to the public, and since 1984 has been in the care of Cadw, the Welsh government body with the responsibility for protecting, conserving and promoting the built heritage of Wales. There are special events held often in the castle and visitors are now able to walk along the battlements and into Martens Tower

Chepstow Castle


Later history - Decline in defensive importance, 1300-1403
From the 14th century, and in particular the end of the wars between England and Wales in the early 15th century, its defensive importance declined. In 1312 it passed into the control of Thomas de Brotherton, Earl of Norfolk, and later his daughter Margaret. Wikipedia

Monmouthshire city - riding in Brecon Canal


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Photo credit: carneycastle.com

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